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A new study reveals that dyslexia is linked to 42 genetic variants

A new study reveals that dyslexia is linked to 42 genetic variants

Researchers believe they have identified the genes responsible for dyslexiaa condition that makes reading or spelling difficult for millions of people.

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, the QIMR Berghofer Institute for Medical Research in Australia, the US company 23andMe Inc and the University of Edinburgh conducted what is considered the largest genetic study of dyslexia to date and recently published their findings in the journal Nature. Genetics.

The study found 42 significant genes while analyzing the relationship between millions of genetic variants and dyslexia. The researchers had access to data from 50,000 adults with dyslexia and approximately one million adults without the disorder.

Some of the genes are major factors in delays in speech and other critical thinking skills that can play a role in harming an individual’s academic performance. More than 30% of the genetic variants scientists have discovered are linked to these cognitive disabilities, many of which are linked to functions that are critical to learning and skill development.

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In the study, scientists found 42 significant variants of dyslexia.

In the study, scientists found 42 significant variants of dyslexia.
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“Our findings show that shared genetic differences have very similar effects in boys and girls and that there is a genetic link between dyslexia and ambidexterity,” said the study’s lead author, Michelle Luciano, who works at the University of Edinburgh’s School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences. of science.

“Our results also suggest that dyslexia is very closely genetically related to performance on reading and spelling tests, reinforcing the importance of standardized testing in identifying dyslexia,” added Luciano.

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Dyslexia-related genes also appear to affect people with the diagnosis Attention deficit hyperactivity disorderaccording to the study.

Chinese-speaking participants were also affected by genetic variants, indicating that the process of reading and writing is not isolated to a single language.

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